With a Little Help…: The Characters of the Corridors of the Dead Part 2

Before I get started, a few things. First is that with the support of a lot of readers, I cracked the Top 100 in the Westerns genre (#83 when I woke up, now down a bit). While overall I feel it more shows just how weak sales of Westerns are overall, I can’t help but be a bit proud, given that this my first release and it’s not even a full-length book. I’m also immensely grateful to the people who bought a copy and my partners on our current tour. It’s also great to be able to give that money to a worthy cause.

Speaking of which, just a reminder that today is the second and final day of our Four Bloggers, Four Books, Two Days promotion. I’ve contributed The Kayson Cycle, and all proceeds from sales of my short story will go to Doctors Without Borders. From Sunday’s post:

Here’s how it works: on November 28 and/or 29, purchase 1 or all 4 of the debut author’s books listed here. Then forward each of your purchase receipts that Amazon emails you, to : motionsrider@yahoo.ca and get up to 4 entries into a draw for a $80 Amazon gift card.  That way we have your name and email to let you know when you win!

On top of that, two random commenters picked from two of our participating blogs will receive $5 gift Amazon gift cards . So leave a comment and let us know what you think of the promo, our authors, our works, even just say hi, we’re not too proud to beg. You’d be helping us out and you’d be helping out your favorite blogger, as the blogger with the most comments also wins a prize. 

With the release of The Corridors of the Dead tomorrow will come another contest – opening tomorrow morning. I wrote about this Sunday, but will of course put the details up again tomorrow.  Continue reading

Getting to Know You: The Characters of The Corridors of the Dead, Part 1

Before I get started, just a reminder that today is the first day of our Four Bloggers, Four Books, Two Days promotion. I’ve contributed The Kayson Cycle, and all proceeds from sales of my short story will go to Doctors Without Borders. From yesterday’s post:

Here’s how it works: on November 28 and/or 29, purchase 1 or all 4 of the debut author’s books listed here. Then forward each of your purchase receipts that Amazon emails you, to : motionsrider@yahoo.ca and get up to 4 entries into a draw for a $80 Amazon gift card.  That way we have your name and email to let you know when you win!

On top of that, two random commenters picked from two of our participating blogs will receive $5 gift Amazon gift cards . So leave a comment and let us know what you think of the promo, our authors, our works, even just say hi, we’re not too proud to beg. You’d be helping us out and you’d be helping out your favorite blogger, as the blogger with the most comments also wins a prize. 

Now, on with today’s show: introducing you, the reader, to the characters of The Corridors of the Dead. Of course, this isn’t a comprehensive listing; I’m not going to talk about Guard #2, but I think it’s a good idea to get these out there as part of my release week specials. I view these as the equivalent of bonus features on a DVD or Blu-Ray, offering not only information to inform your purchase, but something to deepen your understanding of the story once it’s finished. These will eventually sit up top as part of the Corridors official page. So come with me and learn more about these characters after the jump. Continue reading

Dawned on Me: What’s in a Name?

What’s in a name? Well, quite a bit. Think about some of your favorite characters’ traits, and then think about their names. How well do those names suit them? Would John McClane by another name still be Bruce Willis? How about Neo, would he be the same hacker/savior?  Or Harry Potter – can you imagine the young wizard by another name?

Names are important. For quite some time, I believed that character names honestly had no bearing on the character him or herself, despite what others told me. I was so firmly convinced that if a character was compelling, it didn’t matter whether she was Ida Jane or Mary Sue – the power of the name came from the character herself, not the other way around. As I’ve gained more experience, I’ve been won over, at least in part. I still think that a strong character can have a mediocre name and work, but a great character name will accentuate and give the character even more of a “glow”. In other words, I have seen the light.

A good character name can strongly suggest a primary value, establishing a core essence for your character. As I said above, it may not be the most important factor for your character, but it is certainly an effective tool to lend you a hand. I’m not here to offer much more of a list of character names than the ones above, but I’m sure you can come up with your own list in your head right this minute, and it wouldn’t be too hard to sort out why those names are classics and so evocative of their characters. . No, instead, I’m here to offer some general guidelines and maybe answer the question of where to get ideas for names.

Once I realized the wisdom of the advice that I had ignored for so many years, I decided to hit up a few different writing resources online, distilling their advice into a few general rules of thumb that I continue to follow. Here they are:

  1. Reflect the values. As I mentioned above, examine the character that you’re creating and either try to figure out some defining traits or what the character represents within the plot, then see if you can sneak some of those words into the name, at least by phonetic resemblance.
  2. Make the name age-appropriate. Seriously. This is mentioned in one of the links above, from Baby Names, and I can’t possibly stress it enough. To quote: “Decide the age of your character and then calculate the year your character was born. If your character was born in the U.S., browse the Social Security Name Popularity List for that year. You will also want to take into account the character’s ethnic background and the ethnic background of his/her parents.” Very important bit of advice here; would a woman born in the 1990s actually be named Ida Jane? Pretty unlikely, and it strains the credibility of your story.
  3. Avoid names that end in “S”. Lots’s of problems’s this way.
  4. Combine common names and unusual names. This one is pretty self-explanatory. Common first name, unusual last name (Indiana Jones, Freddy Mercury – he counts!). Or vice versa.
  5. Avoid names that sound the same. Think about how confusing it would be to have a Dana, Dan, David, and Drew all in one story. Diversifying sounds and letters simplifies what may already be a difficult task of differentiating characters.
  6. Avoid names that are too long, or find a way to shorten them. Another self-explanatory one, and one that I’ve used recently. Entanglements features a character named Samartha. Great name, I think, has deep significance for who he is, but it’s a mouthful. He becomes Sam pretty quickly among the other characters. There is another character named Samyaza, and to avoid confusion, he is simply referred to as “The Supervisor” and never by name, which fits given his stature in the group.
  7. Avoid already-prominent names. Rhett, Scarlett, Barack, Oprah. You get the picture.

So, with those guidelines in mind, where can you find the best names? The Social Security Popularity list is a good starting point. There are also dedicated online sites for Baby Names, such as Baby Names.com and  Baby Names World.  Language is a Virus also offers a great name database, and Seventh Sanctum and Wizards.com offer random name generators. You can also find great resources for the meanings of names, such as Name Meanings.com and Meaning-of-names.com.

We’ve come a long way from the days when all you had to rely on was a book of character names from Writers Digest and maybe a baby name book or two (both of which I relied upon in the mid-to-late 90s). There are a lot of options out there, and methods that you can use.

Oh, and one other tip. Be sure to pronounce your character’s name out loud before you settle on it, especially if it’s a fantasy name. That way you can avoid creating some of the unintentionally hilarious greats like Zap Rowsdower, Beatrix Kiddo, and Elijah Kalgan. I mean, unless you want to be the butt of jokes. Then go crazy.