Understand the Plan

Apologies for not hitting that Friday post last week, but work continues to be hectic and I’m fortune to get even one blog entry out the door. So hey, consider this a victory alone.

Considering life’s pace, I’m actually quite happy with how much writing I’ve done over the last week. Believe it or not, I’m on track to at least equal my productivity from last week and have made huge strides of progress where Elkmont is concerned. I’m about halfway through the “first act”, which entails the arrival of the characters, and am getting a good feel for their personalities and the clashes inherent in their goals. I’ve found a pretty good way to manage these, which I’ll talk about in a moment, but first I’d like to talk about physicality.

I am an intensely visual person, which is probably why I favor photography so much. I’m drawn to the unusual, the captured moment that reveals something you might not have noticed otherwise. It’s probably related to my love of the obscure (and not in a hipster way, more in that I find some divinity in those small details) and overlooked. When I create a character, they pop into my head visually. I can “see” their height, weight, hair color, etc.

Big deal, I’m sure you’re saying. Most writers do this, as it’s a big part of reading. Fair enough. I tell you this because I also find it important to imagine a story’s “stage”, to understand the overall workings of that world and how the locations fit together. In some instances I’m writing about a place that I know and can wander in my head. In others, not so much. When it comes to a place that’s been abandoned for 50+ years, it becomes even more difficult, as the original details of the place become obscured. How much is left of that building, for example, and has the foundation shifted? I can see bits and pieces of this place in my head but pulling it all together into a cohesive whole eluded me. I found myself itching to create a map of the place, and just decided what the hell; why not do it? So I took a pen and paper and took five minutes to sketch this out.

Yeah, my handwriting is spider-poop.

Not only does it give me the lay of the land, it also allows me to put the story beats into a physical context and have an idea, for example, of how far a character has to run to get from the general store to the hospital. Incredibly helpful, and something I plan to do for the rest of my books in the future. And it works on the micro level, as well; I created a map of the hospital as well and found that the contours of that building suggested some twists and turns to the character interactions. Which brings me to my other “map”: the character motivation map.

Elkmont promises to be my first book written from the point of view of multiple characters, and I need to do each of them justice, so each has their own subplots that thread together and form a background to the overarching plot. This means a need to understand what each character wants, both overall and through the different phases of the story. The answer seemed simple: I needed a chart. Beware, this chart has some spoilers, but I can tell you already that some of these details have already changed, so there’s no guarantee that they will hold.

As I said, the table captures overall goals for the characters, any observations about those goals and how they interact with other characters and the overall plot arc, goals for the three different acts, and obstacles to those goals in each act. The very idea of laying these down, like the hospital map, suggested certain contours. Katie and James both want to make a great YouTube documentary, but for very different reasons. This will cause some dynamic push-and-pull between them as they work together one moment to better the show and then butt heads in others when James insists on being the center of attention because of his marketability. And one character’s lack of ambition will grind at another character. And so on. Add those elements to the overall plot, which involves a dark hidden secret and vengeful ghosts of the past, and you’ve got yourself a stew, baby. Or at least the suggestion of an overall plot.

So I’m feeling pretty good about where I am with Elkmont. This is the giddy portion of the program, where I can just lay down stupid ideas and see if they go anywhere (usually not) and then winnow and shape as we move forward. Tomorrow I’ll be putting the story to a rest, though, with work on “Soul Eater” resuming. And while I haven’t done too much thinking about Soul Eater beyond finding a new title, potentially In the Pines, I also feel like I’ve learned a lot from the Elkmont experience and can transfer those findings over to the third draft of the outline. Before you know it, it’s going to be time to expand that outline into the real deal.

Anyway, that’s all for now. Hope everyone has a great weekend and a great Halloween, if you celebrate. We’ll be seeing the original Halloween on the silver screen Saturday night, after seeing the Exorcist last Saturday. Have to love those $5 horror movies during the Halloween season.

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